Posts Tagged ‘politics’

CORY BOOKER-A MOST INTERESTING POLITICIAN

Written by Halli Casser-Jayne on . Posted in HC-J Blog

Cory Booker is the Mayor of Newark, New Jersey. Many think of Newark as a cesspool. The once gorgeous pride of New Jersey suffered in the 60s racial riots and  has never returned to its former glory. But if Newark ever had a chance to rebuild itself into a city that might make a contribution to  American society, it has a chance now under the bold and often unusual leadership of Mayor Booker. Consider the Mayor’s latest move to live a week on food stamps. Political posturing? Or is Booker a man with a heart for the people he represents. You decide. I have: Mayor Cory Booker is a most interesting politician and one with an equally interesting future.

Walsh, Cooper, Grunwald – Top Political Pundits – Guests for the Hour

Written by Halli Casser-Jayne on . Posted in HC-J Blog

POST-ELECTION COVERAGE – Illuminating hidden truths The Halli Casser-Jayne Show explores the hot button issues of race, media influence and the ideological divide with top political pundits on Nov 7, 3 pm EST.

Top political minds will bring you post-election coverage of Election 2012 and insight into what is in store for the U.S. in the upcoming four years, Wednesday, November 7, 3 pm EST, on The Halli Casser-Jayne Show, Talk Radio for Fine Minds.

Joining host Halli Casser-Jayne is Joan Walsh, editor-at-large for Salon.com, the pioneering, award-winning website, and an MSNBC political analyst, author of “What’s the Matter with White People?” Walsh will shine her perspective on the browning of America and why white working class opportunities have stagnated and declined.

Ms. Casser-Jayne’s second guest is a Time Magazine senior national correspondent, Mike Grunwald, author of The New New Deal, The Hidden Story of Change in the Obama Era in which Grunwald seeks to enlighten America’s thinking about President Obama and his stimulus package as being the most aggressive fiscal stimulus bill in U.S. history, helping to stop an economic death spiral, easing the pain of a great recession and preventing a depression. Grunwald is recognized as one of this generation’s most original and tireless journalists with a talent for illuminating hidden truths.

National Journal editor and former White House correspondent, Matt Cooper, will also join in a political roundtable hosted by Halli Casser-Jayne, author of A Year in My Pajamas with President Obama, the Politics of Strange Bedfellows.

Don’t miss The Halli Casser-Jayne Show, Talk Radio for Fine Minds Wednesday, November 7th at 3 – 4 pm ET as our guests shed light on America’s political future. The Halli Casser-Jayne Show, Talk Radio for Fine Minds and Lovers of Politics is always enlightening.

The Halli Casser-Jayne Show airs Wednesday afternoons from 3 to 4 p.m. EST on BlogTalkRadio.com (http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thehallicasserjayneshow). The Halli Casser-Jayne Show is one of the top shows on the BlogTalkRadio Network, the world’s largest live online talk radio network with over 50 thousand show episodes created each month that attract over 20 million listeners. Podcasts of The Halli Casser-Jayne Show are available on multiple networks including iTunes (http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/halli-casser-jayne-sho…), and via apps in multiple formats. For additional details and to download previous interviews, visit www.hallicasser-jayne.com.

ABOUT THE HALLI CASSER-JAYNE SHOW

Halli began her radio career on “The Dick Summer Show” on WYNY in New York City and has also worked as a reporter and photographer; actress and documentary producer; radio personality; author, editor and publisher. Her radio show, The Halli Casser-Jayne Show, Talk Radio for Fine Minds, features stellar guests from the world of politics, books, art, culture, and celebrity. Recent guests have included Gloria Feldt, author-activist and former CEO of Planned Parenthood; actress Linda Evans; bestselling authors Kristin Hannah and Jackie Collins; star of  Broadway’s Jersey Boys, Russell Fischer; Representative Betty Sutton; Deputy Speaker of the Israeli Knesset, Danny Danon, two-time Pulitzer prizewinner political cartoonist Jim Morin. The Halli Casser-Jayne Show, a production of RESSAC LLC, airs Wednesday afternoons from 3 to 4 p.m. EST on BlogTalkRadio.com. For more information, visit http://bit.ly/U4EEMd. Like the show’s page on Facebook, http://www.fb.me/hallicasserjayne, and follow Halli on Twitter, http://www.twitter.com/HalliCJ.

AT THE HEART OF JOE BIDEN

Written by Halli Casser-Jayne on . Posted in HC-J Blog

These days, heart and politics seem to be anathema to one another. That is the American political reality. While we like to think that our elected officials seek office for the greater good and sacrifice their personal lives in order to serve, more of us know that the truth is that in these cynical times, far too many of our politicians are self-serving. Or, as I like to say, too many of them pledge their allegiance to their parties rather than to their constituents’ needs.

To a generation of Americans the naïve and sentimental Jefferson Smith, the dedicated politician so brilliantly portrayed by that regular guy actor Jimmy Stewart in the film Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, might appear to be a bit of a buffoon. In today’s times, does any politician really give a hoot about anything? Is there even one honest politician out there in the sea of many deceitful ones? I suppose it would be fair to say that they each have their moments, but the moments seem few and far between. If you can’t tell, I’ve been feeling down in the dumps about our country’s politics of late and have been close to losing all hope in our tarnished system.

But just when my cynicism reached full-bore, along came a moment in political history that deserves a shout-out and restores my hope that there is still some heart left in our politicians. In the case of Vice President Joe Biden there is a heart so big the Great and Powerful Wizard of Oz would be proud. We Americans should be, too.

Vice President Biden has served his role as Vice President of the United States admirably. There are some who say that it is a vice president’s job to play the role of America’s buffoon. There’s a long history of vice presidential fall guys, with the poster child for the silliest veep, being, of course, Dan Quayle. Biden has given us some rare performances himself, and taken a few on the chin for his President, Barack Obama. As is our nation’s history, the opposition has played Biden with finesse. Any gaff, however small used to torture the president and vice president with glee.

But here’s the deal: Joe Biden ain’t like other vice presidents. Dumb like Quayle, he is not. Surreptitious like Aaron Burr, he is not. A crook like Spiro Agnew, he is not.

What Vice President Joe Biden is a mensch. For those of you who don’t understand Yiddish, a mensch is a person of integrity and honor. Biden honored us, last Friday, when addressing a group associated with the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors, a national nonprofit that supports friends and family of service members killed in action. Biden delivered what some might call the speech of our lifetime, an emotional retelling of his own family tragedy, the death of his wife and daughter in a car crash 40 years ago, saying the experience helped him understand why people commit suicide.

Biden described the shock and sting of the deaths in 1972, shortly after he was first elected to the Senate, as a “black hole you feel in your chest, like you’re being sucked back into it.”

“It was the first time in my career, my life, I realized someone could go out – and I probably shouldn’t say this with the press here, but – no, but it’s more important. You’re more important. For the first time in my life I understood how someone could consciously decide to commit suicide,” Biden said. “Not because they were deranged, not because they were nuts; because they’d been to the top of the mountain and they just knew in their heart they’d never get there again, that it was never going to be that way ever again. That’s how an awful lot of you feel.”

The vice president has previously spoken about his personal tragedy, although he rarely describes the emotional aftermath in such gut-wrenching detail. Biden recounted how he heard the news while in Washington.

“I was down in Washington hiring my staff, and I got a phone call saying that my family had been in an accident. And just like you guys know by the tone of a phone call – you just knew, didn’t you? You knew when they walked up the path. You knew when the call came. You knew. You just felt it in your bones something bad happened,” Biden said.

“And I knew. I don’t know how I knew. But the call said my wife was dead, my daughter was dead, and I wasn’t sure how my sons were going to make it. They were Christmas shopping, and a tractor trailer broadsided them and in one instant killed two of them and – well.”

Biden, an ardent Catholic, said he was so angry he cried out in the Capitol. “I remember being in the Rotunda, walking through to get to the plane to get home, to get to identify the – anyway. But I remember looking up and saying, ’God!’ It was if I was talking to God myself: ’You can’t be good! How can you be good?’”

Biden said he credits his return from his grief to the help of his mother, his sister and, eventually, his second wife, Jill Biden, whom he married five years later. “This woman literally saved my life,” he said.

“There will come a day, I promise you, and your parents as well, when the thought of your son or daughter or your husband or wife brings a smile to your lips before it brings a tear to your eye. It will happen,” he said. “My prayer for you is that day will come sooner or later. But the only thing I have more experience than you in is this: I’m telling you it will come.”

And so, out of tragedy comes something good: a vice president with heart, just when America needed a lot of heart.

 

“THAT’S POLITICS” IS NOT AN ANSWER

Written by Halli Casser-Jayne on . Posted in HC-J Blog

What does the expression bandied about so often these days, “That’s Politics” mean?

The phrase is tossed around like a kite in a vicious wind. When stated by politicos,  it is said with a shrug and infers that politics is a dirty business, politicians will be politicians and, well, that’s just politics…wink, wink.

And so said the besieged Hilary Rosen on yesterday’s Meet the Press when host David Gregory taunted Ms. Rosen on her first visit to MTM, following Rosen’s controversial remarks on Ann Romney that last week had caused such a stir. ” Ann Romney never worked a day in her life,” Rosen had said, although clearly what she meant to say is that the privileged Mrs. Romney was hardly the poster-girl for most American working women.  Rosen’s ill-chosen words – not her spot-on point- quickly became fodder for the Republicans to disguise their assault on women.

There is much I can say about Hilary Rosen and her pathetic retreat in response to the Republican assault, including saying:  that’s politics.  And there is even more that I can say — and have said — about Hilary Rosen;  the privileged Ann Romney; the misogynistic bent of the Republican Party; the Republican women who are allowing themselves to be used by the GOP’s right-wing coalition and more.

But today I am stuck on Ms. Rosen’s response to David Gregory when he justifiably pointed out that the Democratic Party, to which Ms. Rosen aligns herself, bailed on her at the first sign of trouble. “Everyone in the Democratic Party wasted no time running immediately in the other direction [in the face of Rosen’s remark on Ann Romney] including the president who called Ms. Rosen’s remark an “ill-advised” statement by someone on TV,” David Gregory said.

Ms. Rosen’s response: “That’s politics,” followed by a sigh, a shrug of  her shoulders, a smirk-filled smile.

I share Ms. Rosen’s sigh, feel my shoulders shrug, but you are not going to get a smirk-filled smile from me.  What you will get from me is disgust. Disgust because our politicians have become so immoral in their quest for power that to coin a phrase, they’d sell their own mother under the bus to get where they want to go.  And that goes for Ms. Rosen as well, who gave ground because, ugh, that’s politics. Was she told by the Party to relent because this was not  a battle to be picked? Was she protecting her position within the Party hierarchy?  Any way you look at,  Rosen’s retreat served the Republicans, who on this one came out ahead.  And while that’s politics might be a mantra that soothed the bruised flesh of  Ms. Rosen who willingly accepted the machinations of today’s politics, it did no such thing for me, and frankly, I hope  not for you, either.

Politicians were once our revered citizens, our noble brethren, our altruistic, our compassionate, those who served our nation. I imagine some still are. But narcissism has replaced selflessness and patriotism has been usurped by disloyalty. What’s good for the Party trumps what’s good for the people, the new rule the norm rather than the exception.

Catch phrases have become part of our lexicon. Think of the many and varied repeated ad nauseum. We use them and they fill a niche in our political discourse such as  damage control,  attack ads,  swift boat. But here’s one we should not use, a phrase we should  delete from all political conversation: That’s Politics. Because that’s politics isn’t a phrase at all but rather a sad commentary on the state of our nation’s
politics today.

 

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